Tag Archives: flowers

Starting Seeds!

seedsLast weekend, we worked on starting our seeds for the spring/summer. We did this last year six weeks before the last frost, and my mini greenhouse was seriously out of control. So this year, we started them four weeks before the last frost. But right now, I’m not really sure when the last frost will be given that we just had snow yesterday.

So, I germinated the seeds over night by soaking them in a luke warm bowl, and then just planted each seed in a container. After just three days, I have broccoli, chamomile, datura, and other herbs coming up already!

I’m so looking forward to warmer weather and planting these outside!

Happy Gardening!

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Prepping for Spring!

clematis
Cleaning out planting beds

Today was the first warm (53 degrees), sunny day we’ve had since last October, so my husband and I got busy prepping for spring! It was so nice to feel the sun!

 

We began by cleaning out planting beds–we did this last fall, but we have massive oak trees behind the house and in the yard, so keeping the beds and the yard free of oak leaves is a year round job. We only got two beds done today, but once we did, we could see flowers finally sticking up out of the ground!

Pretty flowers Arriving Soon!

mycrocus2

tulip3
tulips peeking out

The crocus are finally making an appearance. I had about given up all hope for the crocus this year, but here they are! The tulips and hyacinths are also poking their heads out after our long, brutal winter. I’m very much afraid that instead of having a gradation of blooms, everything will bloom all at once; but, better this than no blooms at all! I hope the plants are coming alive in your garden, too!

 

Vegetables

peas
Planting Peas

We also planted our peas today. It is late; normally, we would have done this around March 17, but it’s just been too cold and snowy. I’m hoping for at least one good crop of peas, though! This time, we did add Epsom salts and sugar (1/2 cup each) into the soil instead of other types of fertilizer. As things develop, I’ll let you know what happens with this.

Happy Gardening!

Cat Whiskers: Just for the Beauty of it!

catwhiskersCat Whiskers are a member of the mint family, and are not a perennial in zone 5–although they are considered a perennial in warmer climates. However, they are beautiful flowers that can be taken indoors over the winter.

I’m excited about this bushy plant with the beautiful flowers! The flowers come in purple or white.  I ordered my seeds a few weeks ago, and I’m looking forward to watching them grow.

The plant does have medicinal uses for treating urinary diseases and diabetes, but for me, it’s all about the beauty.

How to Grow

If you are starting with seeds, begin as you would with other seeds. Soak the seeds overnight to help them germinate. Plant in a container and cover with a plastic lid or plastic wrap. When all chance of frost has passed, plant in the yard.

  • Choose a sunny or partially sunny spot in your garden.
  • Dig a hole a bit bigger than the root ball.
  • Mix in fertilizer.
  • Gently place the plant into the hole and cover with soil.
  • Water the plant in well, and be sure to water several times a week.
  • After the blooms fade, remove them to encourage further blooming.

Cat Whiskers make excellent cut flowers and will attract birds, bees, and butterflies to your garden. They are a striking addition to any garden. I’m hoping mine will spread, as it is a member of the mint family…..

Happy Gardening!